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Why Your Vote Matters

Your vote may not directly elect the president, but if your vote joins enough others in your voting district or county, your vote undoubtedly matters when it comes to electoral results. Most states have a “winner take all” system where the popular vote winner gets the state’s electoral votes.

 

There are also local and state elections to consider. While presidential or other national elections usually get a significant voter turnout, local elections are typically decided by a much smaller group of voters.

 

How You Can Make Your Voice Heard?
If you are not yet 18, or are not a U.S. citizen, you can still participate in the election process. You may not be able to walk into a voting booth, but there are things you can do to get involved:
   

  • Be informed! Read up on political issues (both local and national) and figure out where you stand.       

  • Get out and talk to people. Even if you cannot vote, you can still voice opinions on social media, in your school or local newspaper, or other public forums. You never know who might be listening.           

  • Volunteer. If you support a particular candidate, you can work on their campaign by participating in phone banks, doing door-to-door outreach, writing postcards, or volunteering at campaign headquarters. Your work can help get candidates elected, even if you are not able to vote yourself.

 

Participating in elections is one of the key freedoms of American life. Many
people in countries around the world do not have the same freedom, nor
did many Americans in centuries past. No matter what you believe or whom
you support, it is important to exercise your rights.

Source: Why Voting Is Important | National Geographic Society

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